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Iceland Mag

Politics

The support for Iceland's Pirate Party is soaring

By Staff

  • Their support is soaring The Pirate Party has three members in Iceland's parliament Alþingi. From left Jón Þór Ólafsson, Helgi Hrafn Gunnarsson and Birgitta Jónsdóttir. Photo/Vilhelm Gunnarsson

According to a new poll, by research company Gallupthe Pirate Party has the support of 34.1% of the nation. That is more than the combined support of the two parties that form Iceland’s coalition government, the Progressive Party (Framsóknarflokkurinn) and the Independence Party (Sjálfstæðisflokkurinn)

The Pirates received 5.1% of votes in the 2013 elections, meaning that support for the party has almost septupled in two years.

The coalition government has the support of 30.9% of the nation according to Gallup’s poll but the parties were voted into power with 51.1% of the votes in the spring of 2013. The support for the coalition is smaller than the combined support for each individual party.

The Progressive Party, Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson's party, continues to get hit hard in the polls. In the 2013 elections the party got 24.4% of the votes. Now support for the party has plunged down to 8.9%, which is the lowest point measured by Gallup after the elections.

The Independence Party (Sjálfstæðisflokkurinn) is supported by 23% in the new poll but received 26.7% of the votes 2013. The party has been Iceland’s largest party for decades, apart for a few short periods.

The Social Democratic Alliance (Samfylkingin) has 12.4% share of the support in Gallup’s poll (12.9% in the elections), the Left Greens (Vinstrihreyfingin grænt framboð) has a 9.8% support (10.9% in the elections) and Bright Future (Björt Framtíð) has 7.4% (8.2% in the elections).

Read more: The Pirate Party reinforces its position as Iceland most popular political power
Read more: Prime minister’s party flirts with islamophobia and anti-gay views

No party, that does not have members at Alþingi, Iceland's parliament, receives support above 2 percent.

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