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Iceland Mag

Travel

Iceland named one of the places everyone should visit in their 30s, despite it being “too cool”

By Staff

  • It's a question of how you look at things For people who remember Iceland without any foreign visitors the country might seem "overrun" by tourists. The truth is that it's only at the most popular spots, especially in South Iceland, that you can expect to meet crowds of any size. Photo/Raffale Piano

The UK Business Insider has a somewhat conflicting assessment of Iceland as a tourism destination: On the one hand the magazine names a trip to Iceland as one of the trips everyone should take in their 30s. On the other it claims “Iceland has simply become too cool”.

In an article published on December 19 the UK Business magazine listed Iceland among 11 other destinations people should try to see when they are in their 30s, a time which the magazine describes as “a magical time”: “You’re a fully formed adult, with all the responsibility that adulthood entails, but you might also have disposable income to spend.“

"Iceland is a perfect destination, the experts of Business Insiders claim. The Northern Lights in the winter and endless days in the summer, as well as the accessibility of Iceland and proximity to England “making it ideal for time-crunched travellers.”

However, already the next day Business Insider had changed its tune, somewhat, now warning its readers Iceland had become too cool for its own good, urging travellers to go instead to New Zealand.

“Let’s face it. Iceland is cool. Dramatic landscapes, hot springs, lava fields. But that’s just the problem. Iceland has simply become too cool. At this point, it’s estimated that there are more tourists in Iceland than actual Icelandic citizens. So while just uttering the words, “I’m planning a trip to Iceland!” may illicit a thrill from any wanderlust-stricken traveller, it may be time to let this destination lie fallow.“

The latter article in the UK Business Insider prompted a lively discussion among people in the Icelandic tourism industry. While some pointed out that it was correct that some of the most popular tourist destinations are becoming somewhat crowded, most however, have argued that despite rapid growth in the past few years, there is no shortage of places which virtually nobody is visiting. Including the Westfjords.

 

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