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Iceland Mag

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Iceland Airwaves has the option of moving concerts into tents

By Staff

  • Iceland Airwaves As more and more concert venues close down in down-town Reykjavík to make room for development, hotels and shops, Iceland Airwaves might be forced to move some concerts into tents. Photo/Iceland Airwaves.

Iceland Airwaves has been granted permission to erect two large tents in down-town Reykjavík to house concerts during the festival, which will be held on November 4-8. The tents would be located at Ingólfstorg square and by the old harbour.

Concert venues have closed down, still more will disappear
Grímur Atlason, the manager of Iceland Airwaves told The Icelandic National Broadcasting Service that while it was unlikely the tents would be used during this year’s festival it was essential to have the option of moving scheduled concerts into tents in case of unforeseen complications or scheduling problems.

Read more:Economic significance of rock 'n' roll for Reykjavík confirmed: and it sounds way better than Icelandic banking!

It is also crucial to be prepared if concert venues in down-town Reykjavík closed down, Grímur pointed out. Three bars, Húrra, Paloma and Gaukirnn, which have been important concert venues in down town Reykjavík, are scheduled to close to make room for development. In recent years three other important concert venues have been closed down in down-town Reykjavík. Others face problems as nearby hotels have complained over noise levels and loud music.

Over 1000 square meters of added concertn space
The Environmental and zoning commission of the city granted Iceland Airwaves permission for two tents during its meeting yesterday. A smaller tent would be located at Ingólfstorg square, while a larger tent would be located by the old harbour, just west of Harpan, the Reykjavík Convention and Concert Centre, where most of the Iceland Airwaves concerts will be held. The two tents would have a combined space of 1050 square meters (11,300 sq ft) and room for 800 concert guests.

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