Iceland Mag

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Iceland Mag

Travel

Diving in Silfra fissure in Þingvellir National Park between the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates

By Sara McMahon

  • Deep blue Slifra issure is situated close to the shore of Þingvallavatn lake in Þingvellir National Park, South Iceland. Photos/Vilhelm Gunnarsson

The huge attraction of Silfra fissure for divers is the pristine clarity of the water and the fact that one is literally swimming between the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates.  

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Suit up The water in the fissure is ice cold.

The fissure is situated close to the shore of Þingvallavatn lake in Þingvellir National Park, South Iceland. It has been voted one of the world’s top cold-water dive. It´s part of the dramatic divergent tectonic boundary between the North American and Eurasian plates.

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Day-tour Silfra fissure is only a 30-minutes drive from Reykjavík

The fissure has been divided into three sections: Silfra Hall, Silfra Lagoon and the Cathedral.

The last mentioned is a hundred-metre long crack and considered by many to be the most majestic sight, as one can clearly see from one end to the other.

The water in Silfra is quite cold, usually around 2 to 4 degrees Celsius, but wearing a dry suit means one is well insulated against the low temperatures.

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